Art Matters, The Color of Reality

Artists collaborate to make a piece couldn't have come to life without one another.

by Amy Adams

Using dance, performance and painting to create a unified work that we get to see in the form of a video, Color of Reality is a lament. It is a social commentary that laments the death of not only people who were murdered with guns but the injustices found in a broken system in the USA today.

Color of Reality, short film, 2016

Color of reality was written and directed by Jon Boogz, incorporating art by Alexa Meade, and featuring Jon Boogz & Lil Buck. Boogz in a recent NY Times interview about this piece says –

We don’t believe dance is just entertainment. Buck and I believe dance is a tool to educate, a tool to empower. [1]

Something magical happens in The Color of Reality

Something magical happens in The Color of Reality. It happens because it isn’t just a choregraphed dance, nor is it simply a performance piece where people are painted. What makes this work special isn’t just one thing, it’s a myriad of factors; social commentary, dance, performance, painting, creative direction, sound. It all happened because Jon Boogz had an idea and made it a reality by collaborating with others.

screenshot of the video performance art – The Color of Reality

One of his collaborators was Alexa Meade. For me, already having known Alexa Meade’s work, it was thrilling to see it used in a unique way. She is well known for her unique performance art where she paints people and then photographs them. What she produces are performances of her painting people and some other variations and photographs and videos of what look like paintings. So even though she has found an audience and her work was very innovative, unless you could see her perform there was a piece missing.

Together, Boogz, Lil Buck, Meade and others, they were able to make a very powerful and moving piece.

One thing that seems incredible and disturbing to me is that a version that does not include the shooting deaths of the actors, in the end, was posted on Facebook where it had 14 million views. Yet, the full version – the REAL piece – the complete message has only 250k views. Wondering why the short version was only posted? Was it because Facebook is discriminatory and censors videos or was it the choice of the person who posted it on Facebook?

What do you think about this piece? about the changing world of art? about collaboration? about social commentary as art? What do you think about the fact that more people haven’t seen the full piece? Make your voice heard in the comments and thank you for taking the time to read this post.


Jon Boogz The Color of Reality
Jon Boogz Website
Lil Buck and Jon Boogz, Wearing Paint as They Tell a Tale, By GIA KOURLASSEPT. 18, 2016
Alexa Meade
Author: Amy Adams
Amy is fine artist, art researcher, periodic code warrior, supreme lover of dogs, epic gardener, and self-appointed yoga goddess and editor of this site.

This article was originally published by the editor of Conscious Life on Niume by the author on the 2 Oct 2016.